Wisdom and Archetypes of Slavic Deities



Baba Yaga - Goddess of Birth and Rebirth, A Wild Woman

Baba Yaga was originally a very old Slavic Goddess of birth and rebirth, death and regeneration, typically portrayed as a old wild woman riding a mortar with a broom. Her ways were fierce and wild and deep cutting. Now days, she is displayed as an evil witch or hag eating children and spreading horror. Baba Yaga lived deep in the woods in a house which stood on one chicken leg and could turn and dance when Baba Yaga commanded so. Its meaning was to scare away those not welcomed. Her spirit lived in the harvest - the grain. She traditionally dies after harvest and is resurrected again in spring.


Belobog - God of Light and Sun

Belobog is the reconstructed Slavic god of light and the sun, otherwise known as the White God and he is the polar opposite of Chernobog, the black god of Darkness. Belobog and Chernobog depicting the ever-lasting battle between darkness and light, and day and night. Belobog is the Creator of light, the bringer of the good and wealth. He is mostly a part of the Slavic cult in Bulgaria, Poland and Russia. He is very similar, if not the exact equivalent to Svetovid. Belobog primarily represents the side of everything good, light and day, battling the evil, darkness and night. Slavs used to experience the changing of the day and night as the battle of darkness and light, the evil and the good, so naturally, they used personification, turning the common natural cycle into demons and gods – in this case Chernobog and Belobog. He is respected and worshiped as one of the high ranked Gods, besides Svarog and Perun.


Chernobog - God of Darkness

Chernobog is another main slavic God, his name means black God. The counterpart of Belabog the White God. Chernobog and Belabog's relationship depicting the ever-lasting battle between darkness and light, and day and night. While Chernobog is more of a Devil, or the evil demonic God, the White God is the pure opposite – the Creator of light, the bringer of the good and wealth. Chernobog also represents the bad luck. Slavs used to experience the changing of the day and night as the battle of darkness and light, the evil and the good, so naturally, they used personification, turning the common natural cycle into demons and gods – in this case Chernobog and Belobog. Slavs used to justify every good thing with good influence of the Belobog, and if anything bad happened, they would blame the Chernobog, cursing him and praying for Belobog’s victory. They also believed that when autumn comes, everyone should greet it and be thankful for good harvest, believing that people who would not feel that way were poisoned by Chernobog’s black thoughts and the others were blessed by Belobog.


Dazbog - God of Rain, Sun and Fire